Axe Magazine 10-14 Lesson

Posted by on Oct 29, 2014

Axe Magazine 10-14 Lesson

Continuando il discorso dalla puntata precedente, ecco altri esempi per esplorare la tastiera e prepararsi a shreddare. Questo passaggio a terzine di semicrome dimostra una possibile applicazione dei concetti della puntata precedente in un contesto musicale. Un pattern a semicrome che, in modo un po’ inusuale, si muove in senso diagonale. Molti chitarristi, per chissà quale ragione, non praticano questo tipo di movimento… Un altro pattern “diagonale” suddiviso in terzine di crome, basato sulle permutazioni 3, 4, 1 e 4, 1, 2 delle dita della sinistra (prime due terzine). Proseguendo, la diteggiatura varia per adattarsi alla scala diatonica di FA maggiore. Per ora è tutto; ricordiamo di continuare a creare i nostri pattern. E ricordiamo il mio ultimo CD...

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Axe Magazine Italy – June 2014 “Shred Italia”

Posted by on Jul 13, 2014

Axe Magazine Italy – June 2014 “Shred Italia”

Ciao a tutti! Benvenuti alla mia nuova rubrica sulle pagine di Axe. Vorrei iniziare dicendo quale onore sia per me far parte di questa grande rivista. In queste lezioni, insegnerò come diventare uno shredder, un vero virtuoso. Naturalmente, servirà tanto esercizio… davvero tanto! E ricordiamo sempre che, prima di correre, bisogna saper camminare. Nella prima lezione, mostrerò alcuni esercizi di stretching per la mano sinistra, utili per il riscaldamento e per far circolare il sangue nelle dita. È importantissimo scaldarsi prima di suonare; personalmente trovo che se mi riscaldo adeguatamente, eseguendo appena imbraccio la chitarra alcuni fra gli esercizi che sto per proporre, suono molto meglio per tutto il giorno. Mettiamoci nei panni degli atleti, che non iniziano subito a correre più veloci che possono, ma prima eseguono stretching e riscaldamento. Sebbene gli esercizi siano dedicati alla mano sinistra, alcuni sono utili anche per la pennata alternata. Una serie di ottimi esercizi di stretching per scaldare la mano sinistra. Possono essere insidiosi: andiamoci piano! Per l’esecuzione, è necessario fissare due dita alla volta; queste rimangono immobili nella posizione indicata, mentre le altre due dita si muovono su e giù per il manico. La diteggiatura della mano sinistra è indicata nel pentagramma, mentre l’intavolatura mostra, cerchiati, i tasti su cui vanno posizionate le due dita “immobili”. Se avvertiamo dolore alla mano, fermiamoci e scrolliamola. Questi esercizi sono utili anche per la pennata...

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Premier Guitar – Triad Arpeggios Applied

Posted by on Feb 9, 2014

Premier Guitar – Triad Arpeggios Applied

Hello Everyone! Happy New Year! In the last lesson, I showed you some ways to play triad arpeggios up the neck while staying inside the major scale. Also, we covered some three-octave arpeggios and triads moving in a up-down type fashion. This lesson will focus more on how you use these triads over a progression. The important thing is to know where to use these arpeggios as they can really help make your playing more melodic. You don’t have to play the full arpeggio, but it does sound cool at blazing speeds. The goal here is to be able to hear the chords just by playing the arpeggios. Over time, memorize the notes in all the triads in all twelve keys all over the fingerboard. Here, I put together a progression in the key of F# minor. The first few measures are similar to the three-octave arpeggios we have learned in the previous lesson. Over the next three measures, we move to two-string arpeggios. Notice how the progression moves down the neck beginning with A, then to the F#m and then G# dim. In the last measure, the D# and the F diminished are not in the scale, they are just passing chords. Also, remember to use alternate picking throughout this whole example. Download example audio… This is another example using chords from the key of F# minor. I also threw in some octave displacement techniques to keep things interesting. There are some triads used in this line, like the E major triad at the end of the first measure. The last measure implies F#m with some wide interval stretches. Download example audio… This is a chordal string skipping type arpeggio pattern put together with three triads: F#m, E and C#m. I played the arpeggios using more octave displacement. Download example audio… Ok that is it! Be sure to make up your own triad arpeggio ideas, and don’t forget to...

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Guitar Player February 2010 – String Skipping Loops

Posted by on Feb 9, 2014

Guitar Player February 2010 – String Skipping Loops

In this lesson we’ll check out some string-skipping ideas you can loop, as in continuously repeat. This is a techique I love to use in my music, and it is very good for your chops. Because the notation doesn’t always include repeat signs, you’ll have to use your imagination with some of these phrases. Ex. 2 is based on the D Phrygian Dominant scale (D, Eb, F#, G, A, Bb, C). The concept behind this phrase is that the D pedal tone is played after each note. The phrase is based off an ascending four-note scale sequence and then a descending pattern in third intervals. This is a technique used in different types of music, especially classical. Be sure to start slow and then build up speed. This next example, Ex. 2, is in the key of G major (G, A, B, C, D, E, F#). This is a string-skipping pattern that starts off with eighth-note triplets and then, in the 3rd bar, the same phrase is played with sixteenth-note triplets. The tempo is the same throughout, we’re just changing the note value. This is great for developing your right-hand technique and to add some excitement to your playing. Ex. 3 is another string skipping pattern, this time in the A Mixolydian mode (A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G). You will notice the same pattern repeats through the scale with a six-note pattern. The notation is written using straight sixteenth-notes, but also try converting this phrase into sixteenth-note triplets. I begin this pattern with an upstroke, so the right-hand alternate picking pattern will be up, down, up down, etc. You can experiment with the right hand picking that is comfortable to you. The next couple of phrases in Ex. 4 sound real cool looped. In this example, we have a string skipping line that uses the B minor scale (B, C#, D, E, F#, G,  A) with an added b5 interval, which would be a F note. You could think of this as a B minor scale mixed with a B blues scale. The line in Ex. 5 is similar to the previous example, but now we will be skipping two strings and is also in the key of B minor. This moves across the neck very quickly, so be sure to follow the suggested fingerings. There you have it. Don’t be afraid to incorporate different rhythmic patterns...

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Essential Guitarist Feature

Posted by on Feb 2, 2004

Click Here to Download  the entire article and lesson. Text by Simon Badham – Transcriptions and lesson by Mike Campese. Mike Campese’s resume is to die for. His band have opened shows for some of Metal’s biggest acts: George Lynch era Dokken, Winger, Vinnie Moore (maybe not so metal) and the Spin Doctors (edging towards cardboard). Mike also gets an honorable mention for being part of the opening act (on two tours) for one of Shred’s foremost pioneers…Yngwie ‘loves a Twinky’ Malmsteen. This performance pedigree doesn’t come as much of a surprise when you learn that Mike is a GIT Honors Grad who has studied with among others, Paul Gilbert, Scott Henderson and all round shit hot jazz virtuosi Wayne Krantz. However, move the great musical schooling to one side and the real Mike Campese starts to reveal himself. Mike is the model for today’s successful independent artist (especially a predominant instrumentalist). In the current musical climate a savvy independent musician knows that ability alone will not guarantee a long successful career and decent record sales…some form of sustenance is required. To make up Mike’s daily three square musical meals, and help fund his ever exploratory solo albums he authors instructional material (for Guitar Player magazine and various websites) and teaches guitar professionally (60 students a week and a gig at the Burnt Hills Music Academy). This dedication to craft and determined pursuit of a life in music is the perfect representation of the surviving modern independent artist, and it certainly reaps it’s rewards as apparent on Mike’s latest offering “Vibe”. The CD sleeve to “Vibe” gives away just how much success Mike has managed to achieve. As well as looking aesthetically professional, on the insert photographs he’s flanked by at least $10,000 worth of high end Tom Anderson Strats! “Vibe” is a vast musical canvas on which Campese paints an interesting mix of moods, ideas and styles, swaying dramatically from tender acoustic phrasing to full tilt neo classical shred (the album clocks in at a huge 73 minutes). To his credit, Mike sounds supremely confident throughout each of the 16 tracks. Surprisingly, their are also three vocal cuts which nicely break the instrumental milieu and gives a snapshot into his approach when writing band orientated material…his voice is pretty good too. Mike kindly offered to write an accompanying guitar lesson for this feature focusing on improvisational ideas (taken from his CFH Instructional) and excerpts from his latest album...

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